Title: “Beach by Dan Durda” Caption: “Sunrise on a very distant beach.” Otherworldly planetary landscapes and their alien biotas fill my space artwork thanks to a nearly life-long fascination with the idea that we might live in a galaxy packed to the rafters with habitable worlds. As I described in my first blog entry, there was no doubt I was going to end up in a career in science. As a youngster I lapped it all up - astronomy, geology, biology, you name it. I think it was because of the influence of all the nature documentaries I watched growing...

Title: “Mars Landing: Heading for the High Ground by Dan Durda” Caption: “A little Photoshop makeover and Death Valley's Mars Hill becomes... Mars! I used a panorama of a couple images I took during our IAAA Death Valley workshop in 2005 to create this Martian landscape.” As I recounted in my previous blog entry, my early space art was pretty traditional, in many senses of the word. Being completely self-taught I had a lot of catching up to do, but with the help and encouragement of my many IAAA friends I got a lot of satisfaction out of learning to...

Title: “New Horizons by Dan Durda” Caption: “Completed for the New Horizons mission to Pluto before the spacecraft was even built and launched. This was my guess at some of the interesting geological features and activity that we might see when we finally see Pluto up close for the first time. When asked at the post-launch party in 2006 to write on a poster my prediction for what we might see in 2015 I wrote, ‘I predict that Pluto will look nothing like my painting.’ We’ll soon see...” As a professional astronomer who spends a lot of time generating space...

This month's AstroArtist is Yin-Ju Chen whose primary medium is video, but her works also includes photos, installations and drawings. In the past few years she has focused on the function of "power" in human society, nationalism, racism, totalitarianism, collective thinking or collective (un)conscious. Her recent projects also engage in the relations between cosmos and human behaviour. In her special article for AWB, she speaks about what films have inspired her to be interested in astronomy and space. Check out this interesting article! Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave...

I would like to talk about three influential movies that have spurred my artistic practice in recent years. They are 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), For All Mankind (1989), and THX 1138 (1971) 1. 2001: A Space Odyssey The first time I watched 2001: A Space Odyssey was during an unbearably hot summer in Taipei in 2000. I inserted the VCD into my computer, and the long black intro with weird music was the first thing that struck me. After the intro and title card, for 20 minutes, all I saw were apes. I immediately lost interest and moved on...

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Astronomers Without Borders' AstroCrafts web blog presented by Kathleen Horner will share a unique variety of creative, educational and fun astronomy-related crafts inspired by the cosmos in which we live. The AstroCrafts page projects will be presented periodically throughout the year for the whole family that involves hands on arts and crafts that will teach us about the wonders of our universe.  The projects are especially a great resource for schools and other organizations, too.  The AstroCrafts projects is another way we can discover our own inner artist and find personal expression of what we see and feel in the cosmic life that is all around us.