Art and Science Last year, on a sweltering summer day in Montreal, about a dozen scientists and engineers from the International Space University (ISU) spilled into my gallery for a studio visit. Every summer the ISU organizes a three-month long Space Studies Program (SSP) which is hosted in major cities all around the world. Last year the ISU SSP was hosted by the HEC and UQAM right here in Montreal. One of the organizers had heard of my work, and she had made arrangements to bring SSP participants to my studio. I had chosen to present a survey of my...

Moon Missions It was near midnight and my friend Dawn and I were heading out for a hike, despite the cold wind and horizontal drizzle. It was midsummer night, and we had made a pact to walk to the small black-sand beach just outside of town. I grabbed my camera and a bottle of Scotch (to celebrate) and we set off at a brisk pace. Soon the wind stopped and the rain faded away. We were just making our way along the narrow path to the beach when I happened to turn around and spot it: a vivid double rainbow,...

The Naked Eye You know you have the astronomy bug if you keep checking if the sky is clear when the sun begins to set. During observing season, which in Montreal is anytime when there's no snow on the ground, heading for the driveway and craning your neck in the direction of the ecliptic becomes second nature. Even in a downtown setting there's always something to see if you get a reasonably clear sky: the Moon, planets, the Orion Nebula, and various star clusters are great targets for the urban stargazer. I now live in an apartment, and even there...

Introduction Singapore, 1999. I was lying on the grass, looking up into the night sky. A few of my friends and I had gathered on the lawn of an abandoned building overlooking the Singapore Strait to watch the Leonids which, according to the newspaper, were going to be spectacular that year. We sipped wine out of plastic cups, listened to the macaques play in the Banyan trees, and soaked in the balmy, humid night air. None of us had any idea about astronomy. I had bought a copy of Nightwatch by Terence Dickinson and was leafing through the star maps...

I have just returned from the International Astronautical Congress 2015, held in Jerusalem, Israel. It has been a very hectic week during which I met some very interesting artists working with Space. Every week for the next month or so, I will be posting an interview with the artists that I think are developing some great projects in this field of research. This week our guest is Juan Jose Díaz Infante, who in 2010 started thinking of the possibility of sending a satellite into Space with an artistic and social message. During your presentation I was really inspired by how...

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Astronomers Without Borders' AstroCrafts web blog presented by Kathleen Horner will share a unique variety of creative, educational and fun astronomy-related crafts inspired by the cosmos in which we live. The AstroCrafts page projects will be presented periodically throughout the year for the whole family that involves hands on arts and crafts that will teach us about the wonders of our universe.  The projects are especially a great resource for schools and other organizations, too.  The AstroCrafts projects is another way we can discover our own inner artist and find personal expression of what we see and feel in the cosmic life that is all around us.