Erika Blumenfeld Title: Light Recording: Spring 2005 Date: 2005 Medium: Chromogenic prints, aluminum panels, laminate Size: 30x40 inches (76.2x101.6 cm)  Description: In Light Recording: Spring 2005, Blumenfeld documented the 93 days between the vernal equinox (March 20, 2005) and the summer solstice (June 21, 2005)—the time in our year that comprises the season known as spring in the northern hemisphere. At the exact moment of civil sunset on March 20th, Blumenfeld recorded onto photosensitive material solely the amount of natural sunlight radiating toward Earth. Using a hand built light-recording device and 4x5 transparency film, the artist repeated this “light...

My newest painting, 80x80 cm, oil on canvas, finished 14 Dec 2014:   Before and after:     Start-up with a sketch on paper, followed by painting the canvas black with 1 acrylic layer and 1 oil layer. After that, a template for the baby is created, which is put on the canvas. Then, the soft sketching part starts around it with white and shallow colours, using the fingers and dry brushes. The layers usually take a minimum of 5 days to dry in order to continue painting. This is necessary for creating the 3D nebula effect.      ...

Final result, "Space Goddess" oil on canvas 80x80 + 80x40 cm: Close-up First Barbara starts sketching in white with her fingers and/or pencils on a black painted canvas. After that, she starts colouring it, usually very thin and with several layers of paint (mostly 4 or 5) that need to dry every 5 days. The female figure was first drawn on paper, then cut out, placed on the canvas and used as a template. The rest of it was painted intuitively.     The Maya refers to the (Hindu) word/name ‘Maya’, which means ‘illusion’. Anything which is added to reality...

Always fascinated by the universe and miracles of life, Barbara (1984) plunged into astronomy, reading books written by Stephen Hawking and other scientists, and learning some extra physics when she was in high school. Maybe she would to be an astronomer some day… This did not happen! For Barbara’s interests where all over the place and she couldn’t focus enough on only scientific studies…  After deciding that she didn’t want to spend her young life on hours of math and other mental constructions in her apartment, she decided to put all the books aside and started exploring the world in...

Dan Durda is a self-proclaimed Renaissance man. Scientist, artist, spelunker, pilot, he even has an asteroid named after him (6141 Durda). This month, especially for AWB, Dan writes candid articles about how arts and science came together for him naturally and how his art has evoled throughout the years with the help of digital media. In My (Non)-Tradtional Path to Space Art  he explains how science was a big influence in his young life and how art was always just "there". A huge change in his art came when he discovered Photoshop!  In  Opening a Digital Pandora's Box Dan explores...

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Astronomers Without Borders' AstroCrafts web blog presented by Kathleen Horner will share a unique variety of creative, educational and fun astronomy-related crafts inspired by the cosmos in which we live. The AstroCrafts page projects will be presented periodically throughout the year for the whole family that involves hands on arts and crafts that will teach us about the wonders of our universe.  The projects are especially a great resource for schools and other organizations, too.  The AstroCrafts projects is another way we can discover our own inner artist and find personal expression of what we see and feel in the cosmic life that is all around us.