"Saturn From Titan" by Chesley Bonestell, © The Bonestell Archve Chances are if you are the kind of person who looks up into the night sky and stops in wonder, you are also the kind of person who would climb aboard a starship and go see those distant wonders up close if offered a seat. Don’t worry, you are not alone in those “otherworldly” desires! Unfortunately, we don’t have starships (yet!), but we do have the next best thing – human imagination. And if you combine that imagination with those otherworldly desires and some artistic talent, you get a group...

Drawing by Jon Lomberg when he was four years old AWB AstroArts Project chair, Daniela De Paulis in a conversation with Jon Lomberg, AWB AstroArtist of the Month for May 2013. Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave a comment Click Here to Login

Here is a group of paintings where I bind the Universe to familiar things in a way more poetic than literal. So much of space art has been focused on what a viewer might really see from, say, the surface of Mars. I became interested in showing what can never be photographed, only imagined. Inspired by real science, these visual metaphors have a different layer of meaning. The Backbone of Night from COSMOS The !Kung people of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana describe the Milky Way as the "backbone of night". In 1973 Carl Sagan asked me for a painting...

In late 1964, two missions were launched by NASA with destination Mars! They were Mariner 3 and Mariner 4. Both of them were sent to flyby the Red Planet and take the first pictures and scientific observations, transmitting to Earth precious information about interplanetary space and Mars. At that point in history no one had ever seen how Mars looked like. There was a lot of speculation and with earth telescopes it was possible to see that Mars had an atmosphere and changes in color and many so dark patterns forming seasonally. So there was a hope in many that...

On Aug.5, 2012 NASA landed the Curiosity rover on Mars to begin a two-year science on Mars at Gale Crater, near the Martian equator. There are features there that were formed by water long ago, so it is a good place to explore for ancient signs of life. Curiosity is filled with complex instruments to study Mars’ surface and atmosphere. But Curiosity also carries a simple experiment for schoolkids on Earth: a sundial to watch. In the same way a sundial is used on Earth, this martian shadow can reveal the season, latitude, and time of day on Mars. The...

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Astronomers Without Borders' AstroCrafts web blog presented by Kathleen Horner will share a unique variety of creative, educational and fun astronomy-related crafts inspired by the cosmos in which we live. The AstroCrafts page projects will be presented periodically throughout the year for the whole family that involves hands on arts and crafts that will teach us about the wonders of our universe.  The projects are especially a great resource for schools and other organizations, too.  The AstroCrafts projects is another way we can discover our own inner artist and find personal expression of what we see and feel in the cosmic life that is all around us.