AWB AstroArts Project chair, Daniela De Paulis in a conversation with Jon Ramer, President of the International Association of Astronomical Artists (IAAA). How did you get interested in Space Art? What was your first encounter with it? My interest in space came about as a child when my father was stationed in Florida and I got to see some of the Apollo moon launches in person. I remember the awe at the whole world shaking from the sound of a Saturn V booster going up. I thought rockets were pretty cool before that, but afterwards I was obsessed! I quickly...

AWB AstroArts Project chair, Daniela De Paulis in a conversation with Jancy McPhee, Director of the Humans in Space Youth Art Competition , an international project to inspire youth to think about and creatively communicate what they believe is the future of human spaceflight and why it is important. How did the idea for the competition start? The competition idea began from a convergence of several things back in 2009. First, I had just taken “innovation” training; so, I was actively trying to keep my mind open to my own seemingly “crazy” ideas. Second, morale in the US space program...

"Saturn From Titan" by Chesley Bonestell, © The Bonestell Archve Chances are if you are the kind of person who looks up into the night sky and stops in wonder, you are also the kind of person who would climb aboard a starship and go see those distant wonders up close if offered a seat. Don’t worry, you are not alone in those “otherworldly” desires! Unfortunately, we don’t have starships (yet!), but we do have the next best thing – human imagination. And if you combine that imagination with those otherworldly desires and some artistic talent, you get a group...

Drawing by Jon Lomberg when he was four years old AWB AstroArts Project chair, Daniela De Paulis in a conversation with Jon Lomberg, AWB AstroArtist of the Month for May 2013. Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave a comment Click Here to Login

Here is a group of paintings where I bind the Universe to familiar things in a way more poetic than literal. So much of space art has been focused on what a viewer might really see from, say, the surface of Mars. I became interested in showing what can never be photographed, only imagined. Inspired by real science, these visual metaphors have a different layer of meaning. The Backbone of Night from COSMOS The !Kung people of the Kalahari Desert in Botswana describe the Milky Way as the "backbone of night". In 1973 Carl Sagan asked me for a painting...

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Astronomers Without Borders' AstroCrafts web blog presented by Kathleen Horner will share a unique variety of creative, educational and fun astronomy-related crafts inspired by the cosmos in which we live. The AstroCrafts page projects will be presented periodically throughout the year for the whole family that involves hands on arts and crafts that will teach us about the wonders of our universe.  The projects are especially a great resource for schools and other organizations, too.  The AstroCrafts projects is another way we can discover our own inner artist and find personal expression of what we see and feel in the cosmic life that is all around us.