Soma, project of installation, room 29 / Forte Carpenedo, Venice. Soma / Invasive Neuronal Signal is a sound/light/sculpture and site-specific installation in room 29 at the Forte Carpenedo. Noises, buzzes and beats symbolize what happens in our minds or in the earthly subsoil. A disordered habitat, a dusty and chaotic mind's sound, where the human body is well represented in an escalation of heart's beats, which soon leading to collapse. Another habitat, more sculptural and corporeal, seems a jumbled reticulum of infinitesimal connections and links. Neurons form not only the whole mind, with its memories and knowledges, but also govern...

BY WILLIAM K. HARTMANN, PLANETARY SCIENCE INSTITUTE, TUCSON, ARIZONA Caption: “Formation of Terrestrial Planets”. The origin of planets in the primordial solar system. The view shows the late stages of the dusty nebula, and aggregating planetesimals near the plane of the disk. The largest foreground object is developing an extended atmosphere of degassing volatiles. Gas jetting away from the disk is seen around the sun. (Copyright William K. Hartmann). Learning to “see,” to sense what things really look like, raises a subordinate question. To make a painting of a tree should you walk over to the tree and take some...

Isostasia-1 / Video still BY NICOLE VOLTAN The geological principle of Isostasy explains how different topographic heights can be on the Earth's surface. It is a term used in geology to refer to the state of gravitational equilibrium on the Earth's surface. If this balance is altered, due to a change in the Earth's surface density (for example because of mountains erosion, accumulation of sediments or ice defrost) the Earth's crust tries to restore itself with some isostatic adjustments, such as the Orogeny (the rise of the mountain ranges). Isostasy is not a process that upsets equilibrium, but rather...

Kitt Peak Solar Telescope by William K. Hartmann Jon Ramer: Hi Bill, thanks for chatting with me. First, let me say congratulations on your recent award of the Shoemaker Distinguished Lunar Scientist Medal. Could you tell us a little about why you were awarded this honor? William Hartmann: It’s primarily because my hair has turned grey. However, in addition, I had a long history of lunar work. As a graduate student I discovered the Orientale multi-ring impact basin working on a “rectified lunar atlas” project where we projected photos onto a globe and photographed features as seen “from above.” Once...

BY NICOLE VOLTAN For each successful attempt, there is the impression of figuring out the entire world and geometries, schemes, diagrams that illustrate our acquired knowledge. In truth at the same time, we know that a protective curtain felt on us, and after all, we are even more helpless. Understanding Nature generates also sadness, because in this way the myth and the illusion are decreasing. I find this wonderful contradiction in the art works of Nicole Voltan. She observes nature in a scientistic way, but her art is rather full of darkness and uncertainty and reminds us that, even knowing...

Subcategories

Astronomers Without Borders' AstroCrafts web blog presented by Kathleen Horner will share a unique variety of creative, educational and fun astronomy-related crafts inspired by the cosmos in which we live. The AstroCrafts page projects will be presented periodically throughout the year for the whole family that involves hands on arts and crafts that will teach us about the wonders of our universe.  The projects are especially a great resource for schools and other organizations, too.  The AstroCrafts projects is another way we can discover our own inner artist and find personal expression of what we see and feel in the cosmic life that is all around us.