by Tony Berendsen (of Tahoe Star Tours ) Rene' how thou are Witness the emergence of a star We are, and so beguiled Occulted once and few awhile A dimming so subtle To miss would be less Than a mote of dust Past a cathedral 's spire. But, within the dusty dimness Kant and Copernicus within us The tinny disk of Venus Traversed our nearest star. Impossibly, without braving space Our essence rose to find a distance, To mark, to measure our existence Within the frightening wonder Of our mind's persistence. Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post...

The whole creation Is yearning skyward tonight… What are we seeing? by Bob Eklund, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A. PHOTO CAPTION: Erin Emily Eklund, age 8, gives her dog Leia a peek at Planet Jupiter. What does Leia see? Photo by Dana Eklund, Valencia, California, U.S.A. Comments Showing 1 comments Victor Sunstar 10 June 2016 Well... Lea is looking at the... DOG STAR ! Reply You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave a comment Click Here to Login

-by Andrei Dorian Gheorghe- Yesterday evening when I returned home desolate after a new hard day at my stressing job, I felt the pressure of a superior light for the first time after a few cloudy weeks. “You forget me too often while I think of you all the time!” said to me the Moon and then she asked me: “How many real friends do you have?” Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave a comment Click Here to Login

by Deirdre Kelleghan, Bray County Wicklow, Ireland (AWB National Coordinator for Ireland) Luna rose in Jupiter mood Bands and zones Cloud slices Eclipsing the eclipse Luna rising in penumbra phase from Bray County Wicklow, Ireland—a fleeting glimpse before the clouds took over, 16:14 (local time), 10 December 1011. Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave a comment Click Here to Login

by Bob Eklund The pink overcast Opens to Orion's stars: A change of season. The low stratus clouds, which so often form at night over the coastal part of Los Angeles where I live, were a shade of dark pink as a result of our sodium-vapor street lighting. Then a gap opened in the cloud-layer, like curtains parting at a play, just big enough for Orion to show through. And the sky beyond the cloud deck was less light-polluted than usual, since the low clouds kept the light from reaching the upper sky. Comments You need JavaScript to be...