Fly me to the Moon And let me play among the stars, Let me point a telescope And see the spring on Mars... In other words, Star party time! Editor's Note: "Fly Me to the Moon" is the theme of this year's Global Astronomy Month (GAM), April 2018. GAM's rich schedule of events includes the Global Star Party April 21. We encourage blog readers to send their own moon-related poems to the AstroPoetry Blog in advance of April 1, to help kick off GAM 2018 and celebrate its "Fly Me to the Moon" theme. Send blog poems to: [email protected] For...

Jupiter's shining in the late summer sky, An almost full Moon, emerges close by, Vega glows blue in the darkness above, The great Double Cluster is one we all love. Andromeda's mistiness teases the eye, A meteor darts across darkening skies, The clouds fade away giving me hope, It looks like it's time to set up the scope. Warm jacket and boots, red torch at the ready, Check your kit's cold, and tripod is steady, With batteries charged, eyepieces looked out, "Turn the damn lights off" I hear someone shout. With these little thoughts, your hobby will grow, And empty...

Remains of stars adorn the sky with nebulae aglow on high in stunning patterns that romance the wondering stargazer's glance or simply senses mystify. While stellar orbs are born and die, do heavens strum a lullaby as all around the cosmos dance remains of stars? Might there be heard celestial sigh when Man seems deaf to wisdom's cry and Mother Nature looks askance? Will humans waken from their trance? For in our earthly beings lie remains of stars. ~ Harley White * * * * * * * * * “We are star stuff which has taken its destiny into...

Two black crows at dusk Swoop by me, their wings wetted By the mid-March rain. Image credit: Restoration by Adam Cuerden, Sidney Hall , via Wikimedia Commons Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments You need to be logged in to leave a comment Click Here to Login

Is it planet ten it's so far out near the gates of heaven designated as a dwarf too perhaps the home of the remarkable Dr Who hidden by Pluto on the Kuiper edge second most distant in solar knowledge its surface is icy all frozen solid next to no gravity very sparse and arid Eris and Pluto are said to be twins there are inhabitants no quaint little buildings some ten billion miles from our bright star a long long flight a neighbour of Quaoar* *pronounced “kwawar”. Image credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eris_(dwarf_planet)#/media/File:Eris_and_dysnomia2.jpg Comments You need JavaScript to be able to post comments...